Ohio Humanities’ ongoing Democracy and the Informed Citizen project recognizes that news literacy is a key component being an informed citizen in today’s world of “post truth” and “alternative facts.” Connecting people with the tools to think critically and read with discernment is a crucial part of helping them understand where information originates, the ways in which information can be manipulated, and the motivations prompting what is being shared.

We are excited to share some news from the News Literacy Project (NLP), which, with the E.W. Scripps Company, one of the nation’s largest independent TV station owners and steward of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, announced a multi-year partnership to help the next generation of news consumers learn to separate facts from falsehoods in today’s challenging information landscape.

Working together, educators, journalists and media organizations can create the momentum to achieve NLP’s vision: to embed news literacy in the American middle school and high school education experience. We are excited to join forces with Scripps toward this urgent goal.

Scripps journalists will visit schools, either in person or virtually, through our Newsroom to Classroom program to talk with students about what they do and why their work is important. They also will participate in NewsLitCamps® — our one-day professional development events, hosted by news organizations and taught by journalists and NLP staff, that provide educators with the knowledge and resources to teach news literacy.

In addition, the Scripps National Spelling Bee will help connect its national audience of students and teachers with NLP’s programs, including the Checkology® virtual classroom.

Another key initiative of the partnership is National News Literacy Week, which is slated to run from Jan. 27 to Feb. 2, 2020. During this week, Scripps’ local television stations and national media brands will use NLP’s news literacy offerings to produce special coverage, programs and events across the country that engage audiences in discussions about the importance of news literacy and the role of a free press in a healthy democracy.

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